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Working in Norway

What’s your look on ‘Link’?

Written by Karin Lee Mar. 19 2020

Lately, I’ve been getting a lot of editing work from graduating students who are heading out into the working world. They need their CVs, cover letters and LinkedIn profiles looked at by an outsider whose job is to help them put their best writing foot forward so they’ll quickly land a job after finishing school. …

Lately, I’ve been getting a lot of editing work from graduating students who are heading out into the working world. They need their CVs, cover letters and LinkedIn profiles looked at by an outsider whose job is to help them put their best writing foot forward so they’ll quickly land a job after finishing school.

Which I’m happy to do. I like helping young people in this practical way.

But it isn’t always just their words that need looking at.

A pro photo?

Nah, I’d say it’s the photo that many of these youthful job seekers use that needs a second glance. Or should say gets a second glance from me, as I’ve been getting a bit surprised at what they consider to be a professional picture.

Most seem to be centered around a vacation they’ve had or a party they’ve been at, as I’ve seen everything from pools to palm trees in the background of their smiling faces.

Even worse, they usually put these snapshots on both their CVs and LinkedIn profiles.

Figuring maybe that if it looks good in one place, it’ll look good in the other.

Out of touch?

Really?, I ask…or….

Am I a critical dinosaur who’s out of touch with modern millennial life?

Well, I’d answer this question by pointing to a survey just put out by CareerBuilder where hiring managers gave reasons for why they had/had not hired job candidates.

One of the top reasons they didn’t hire them:

  • The candidates showed ‘provocative or inappropriate photos… (39%)

One of the top reasons they did hire them:

  • The candidates showed ‘a professional image’ (36%)

 So I’ve been writing these reasons in my replies to my young clients, suggesting that they take the time and effort to replace their current inappropriate picture with something that a hiring manager would consider appropriate.

Look at the numbers, then look at yourself

Sometimes feel like a drag for doing it – am I stifling this person’s sense of fun and creativity? – but have to include my words of warning along with my corrections of their writing mistakes.

After all, this kind of image-related mistake is easy to fix, isn’t it?

And wouldn’t it be a bigger drag not to get a job because their picture doesn’t make the hiring manager think that they want it that much? That they’re not serious about trying to get hired?

Something to think about and take a look at, no?

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